Binge Review 8: Bodyguard

In a world of Mary Sues entertainment media is going through a draught of flawed protagonists. What I mean is characters that are damaged, not ones that can take damage like John Wick or Marvel heroes. There is nothing more relatable than a character that is a little broken, not a perfect Adonis with everything going right in life that knows all the right answers. Real people feel fear and anxiety and there are not a whole lot of protagonists that contemporary writer’s are brave enough to bend and break. David Budd from Netflix’s Bodyguard is who we have been looking for.

About the same time I am writing this, actor Richard Madden just received a Golden Globe for his performance as Budd. To say it is totally deserved would be an understatement. Those six episodes had some of the finest examples of acting in recent memory. Madden went from a very run-of-the-mill part on Game of Thrones to a deeply complex and harrowing role. The range on display throughout Bodyguard is a credit not only to him, but the writer that put Budd on paper.

What you get is a character with a long history of trauma from his service in the military that destroyed his marriage. Instead of his experience making him an expert like we see all too often, it actively hinders his ability to function. That is not to say he fails constantly, but his anxiety affects how he responds to various situations. Each episode he struggles to maintain the appearance of composure, even as he is panicking and the odds are stacked against him.

Wrapped around the complexity of Budd is one of the best political/action thrillers out there. For any otaku reading this, imagine Jin-Roh if it were set in modern day Britain, and involved Muslim terrorists. It is not just a show about a guy protecting a VIP from would-be conspirators, but a layered narrative of intrigue. One way or another, everyone involved has something to do with something, and maybe not in the ways you think. The whole affair is surprisingly easy to follow as the show goes on.

There is also a consistent feeling of satisfaction from episode to episode. It is hard to explain, but you feel so fulfilled by what happens because you learn so much about the mystery, and Budd’s character. There is never a dull moment with scenes of tension replacing potential action sequences. Bodyguard could have been a procedural action show, but miraculous makes scenes of dialog and intrigue easily consumable and intense. For me personally, it was also satisfying to see a Scotsman surpasses Englishmen in competence despite his issues. It is like Braveheart, but with a smaller body count.

If you watched the Golden Globes and wondered who and why Richard Madden won Best Actor in a Drama Series, you owe it to yourself to check out Bodyguard. There are many movies and shows that do the same thing, but thanks to one fantastic performance and a very well written narrative, this show is stands above the rest. If you have a subscription to Netflix, you have no excuse to not look it up.